Welcome to MR and its many and wonderful community venues. You will find below an up-to-date list of our current partnerships, their histories, and contact information. Feel free to contact a venue directly with any questions about the upcoming concert being held there. General inquiries can be made to the MR Box Office at (902) 634-9994 or stjartsalliance@eastlink.ca.

Generally speaking, tickets are always available through reservation from the MR Box Office and at the door. In addition, some venues have their own local ticket selling arrangements, such as at shops or through community organizations. MR is pleased to offer affordable tickets to all their concerts. Our average price is $20 for general admission and $10 for a special student discount. Cecilia Retreat events are by advance reservation only, so make sure you write Barbara at barbara.butler@ns.sympatico.ca to save a spot for one of her next house concerts!

We hope you enjoy exploring Nova Scotia through its historic venues and great music.

Annapolis Royal

King’s Theatre

Today's King's Theatre is the beneficiary of over 400 years of live theatre in Nova Scotia. Canada's first play was performed here at Annapolis Royal in 1606.  As the bustling seaport town grew, it became a regular stop for traveling troupes and roving thespians, and live theatre thrived. The theatre building itself has a history of gritty survival. The original structure, along with much of the downtown area, was destroyed in the town's "Great Fire" of 1921. The new building on the present site housed a movie theatre until it was abandoned in the late 70's. A newly renovated and revitalized King's Theatre opened its doors again on March 11, 1982, and live theatre came back to town. Possession of the theatre subsequently passed from the town of Annapolis Royal to an independent society of area residents which, together with a board of directors, continues to oversee the operations of the theatre.

The theatre today offers comfortable seating for 220 in an intimate atmosphere with state-of-the-art acoustics. In this setting, the theatre now operates as a non-profit performance arts center to fulfill its mandate of encouraging cultural, artistic, and educational development.  King's has established an enduring reputation for eclectic variety in its programming, an approach designed to appeal to the widest possible audience. The result has been a potpourri of outstanding entertainment including musical interpretations of Nova Scotia's Acadian, Celtic and Aboriginal cultures as well as music in the classical, country, folk and world music. In live theatre, King's offers the works of various touring companies and presentations by the local theatrical society. A growing favourite are the 10-minute plays of the annual King's Shorts Festival featuring local and area playwrites, directors, and actors. Dance is always on the program as well as children's theatre, comedy, and an occasional taste of opera. We are also a movie theatre - the only one in the area – with a playbill including late releases plus international films imported by our own Film Society. With performers and shows from the local and international scene, emerging and award-winning artists, we have something for everyone.

Address
King’s Theatre
358 St George Street
Annapolis Royal, NS
(902) 532-7704

www.kingstheatre.ca
Tickets
King's Theatre Box Office - online, in person, or over the phone! (see above)
Venue Chair
Geoff Keymer
gm@kingstheatre.ca

Bayfield

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church


The Church of St. Mary the Virgin is nestled on the picturesque shores of St. George's Bay. The area is comprised of gently rolling farmlands and sandy beaches. A tragic fire in the late 1890s destroyed the original St. Mary's and the current Church was built in 1902. It is an architectural gem with a wooden interior that provides warmth and intimacy as well as a wonderful acoustic.

Address
St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church
1407 Summerside Road
Bayfield, NS
(902) 863-5089
www.threeharbours.net

Tickets
Lyghtesome Gallery
166 Main Street
Antigonish, NS B2G 2B7
(902) 863-8122
Venue Chair
Jeanine Gunn
(902) 386-2481
jeaninegunn@yahoo.com

 

 

Bedford

St. John’s Anglican Church

St. John’s Anglican Church is an old parish with a new building. The first service of the Parish of St. John's Anglican Church was held at Three Mile Inn near the Bedford Basin on June 12, 1839. Sunday evening services were established at the schoolhouse near Three Mile Inn until November of 1840. On May 1, 1841 it was proposed that a church building be erected and on June 22 of that year, land for the original church and cemetery was donated by St. Paul's Church. St. John's Chapel was built through the dedicated efforts of the Reverend William Uniacke who was part of a sub-committee to oversee the property and building of the new church. The dimensions of the church (44' X 28') were established and six tenders were accepted for consideration. On September 8, 1841, the church's frame was built in Dartmouth and was subsequently floated up the Basin for placement at the site. The building of the church was completed in a mere six weeks after the frame was raised.

The decision to change the site occupied by the first St. John's Anglican Church to its second location resulted from the area's population growth and a generous provision of property donated by the late Mr. Henry Deal. This second parish complex was constructed at the intersection of Dutch Village Road with Bayers Road and Joseph Howe Avenue. The cornerstone of the second St. John's Anglican Church was laid in December of 1959, and the building, designed by Keith L. Graham and Associates of Halifax, was built by MacDougall Construction Company Limited of New Glasgow. The church was constructed of steel and masonry with glass panels. A striking architectural feature of the day was the interior breadth of the sanctuary as well as the height of three crosses near the main entrance. The ‘Opening and Service of Dedication’ was held on Friday, February 26, 1960 with a consecration on April 25, 1973.

The third manifestation  of the church started with a service of ‘Celebration and Thanksgiving’ by the Right Reverend Fred Hiltz, fourteenth Bishop of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, on Sunday, March 25 2007, during which sentences of consecration were revoked. The property was sold and the complex was demolished to make way for a new commercial development. The parishioners moved on to temporary locations in the Clayton Park West area including a long period using the J.A. Memorial Chapel within the facilities of Snow's Funeral Home.  It took several years to seek out suitable property and several months to construct the new church complex.  The new building was designed by architect Foster MacKenzie and constructed by Jetco Contracting Ltd. on land purchased at 787 Kearney Lake Road in the West Bedford development area. The parishioners rejoiced as they took possession of the building in December of 2013 just in time to hold the first worship services during the last Sunday of Advent and then Christmas Eve of that year.  The ‘Blessing of the New Church Building’ took place on February 23, 2014 with the Right Reverend Sue Moxley, fifteenth Bishop of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, presiding.

Address
St. John’s Anglican Church
787 Kearney Lake Road
Bedford, NS B4B 1E2
(902) 832-5649
www.stjohnshalifax.ca
Tickets
St. John’s  Parish Office - details above
Venue Chair
Rev. Randy D. Townsend
rector@stjohnshalifax.ca

 

 

Chester

St. Stephen’s Anglican Church

St. Stephen’s Anglican Church was part of the Parish of Lunenburg until 1800. To accommodate a growing congregation, the present church was built in 1840. The new church was consecrated on June 5, 1842 by Bishop John Inglis. The interior of this second building was originally laid out with enclosed pews which were used until 1899. Box pews were then installed and the church has remained substantially the same since that time.

Address
St. Stephen’s Anglican Church
60 Regent Street
Chester, NS B0J 1J0
www.saintstephenschester.ca
Tickets
Pharmasave
3785 Highway 3
Chester, NS B0J 1J0
(902) 275-3518

Chéticamp

Eglise Saint-Pierre

Cheticamp is an Acadian Parish founded in 1785 and entrusted to the Eudist Fathers in 1953. Three churches were successively built, in 1790, 1810, and 1861, about one mile south east of the present one. The current church was constructed in 1893 at the cost of $41,950 by Father Fiset whose tomb may be visited under the Sanctuary. Stones for the construction were hauled on the ice by groups of parishioners from Cheticamp Island across the harbour. The church is 212 feet long, 74 feet wide, and the steeple rises to 167 feet. In 1957 the church was repainted and decorated with frescoes and stained glass windows were added. The organ, one of the first Casavant, was acquired in 1904 and is still in excellent condition. St. Peter's Church is situated on high grounds near the harbour and can be seen from all parts of the Parish, from the mountains and from the sea for many miles around. This imposing monument, with its architecture, its frescoes, and its stained glass windows, is one of the most beautiful churches in the Maritime Provinces. It is also a witness to the deep faith and determination of its parishioners of past and present generations.

Address
Eglise Saint-Pierre
15119 Cabot Trail
Chéticamp, NS
(902) 224-2064
Tickets
Les Trois Pignons Visitor Information Centre
Venue Chair
Paul Gallant
pauldgallant@gmail.com

East River

St. George’s Anglican Church

St. George’s Anglican Church was built at East River Point in 1889, and remains a gem on the shores of Mahone Bay. The land for St. George’s, East River (then known as Indian Point) was deeded to the Lord Bishop of Nova Scotia and his successors by John and Sarah Rost on April 1, 1889. The church was built by a man named Strum of Mader’s Cove. Hand-hewn timbers were donated by Michael Fleet. The foundation was made of hand-split granite blocks, using hand-drills and ‘feathers’. There were many helping hands in this great community effort, and both the oxen and the people worked hard.

The first services were held (as was often the custom in small or new communities) in the old School House on the site of the Village Hall, before the church was built. Most of the cost was met by donated labour and materials, but money was needed too, and was raised in many ways.  Old records state, "A picnic was held in the big field, now Mr. Selvyn Cook’s homestead. The men made big tables and benches and box swings. There were races, and games. The ladies cooked and served a big supper. In the evening, there was dancing to fiddle music on an outdoor stage. Mrs. Artemus Cook and Mrs. Henry Melvin made fresh butter, gathered the fresh eggs, packed their baskets full and walked to Mill Cove and vicinity by way of a wooded path to sell the produce and collect contributions of money."

How did St. George’s Church receive its name? As the booklet by Mrs. John Meisner and Mrs. Terry Young says, "At the opening meeting, Rev. [George] Butler having suggested to name the Church St. James for Mr. James Cook, Mr. Cook replied, ‘Oh no, my master, not James for me, but George for you, sir.’ So the little church had a name, St. George’s, for the rector, named by a modest and good-living man in the person of Uncle Jim Cook."

The church bell which is rung every Sunday was cast in 1891 by M.C. Shane Bell Foundry at Baltimore, Maryland, and was used down the years not only to summon the faithful to worship, but also to signal news of deaths in the community and other notable events. The cemetery was first used in 1889, when a 14 year old, named John Roast, was buried on May 2nd. Mr. Joe Countway donated land for a cemetery extension in 1951, and more land was donated by Donald Cooke in 1962. The church steeple was radically changed during the Rectorship of Fr. Bev Strople, from a four-pinnacle style like that of Canterbury Cathedral (and St. Stephen’s, Chester) to a spire and cross. A Vestry was added and later enlarged to house a furnace; “let all the earth keep silence before Him”--indeed, the clergy and people silently sighed because the old furnace housed formerly in the nave (which howled through the services) was silenced forever.

With its tall bell tower, topped by an octagonal ‘witch’s cap’ style roof featuring a large cross finial, the church was used as a landmark both from the road and the ocean for decades. Though still used as a landmark by land, the trees between the church and the ocean have obscured the church’s visibility from the ocean today.

Address
St. George’s Anglican Church
7338 Highway 329
East River, NS B0J
Tickets
Finishing Styles Hair Salon
6 Pig Loop Road, Chester
(902) 275-5966
St. Stephen's Parish Office
​54 Regent Street, Chester
(902) ​​275-3804
Venue Chair
Sabine Richter
(902) 670-5773
spr201250@gmail.com

Georgeville

St. George’s Roman Catholic Church

St. George’s Church is situated in a quiet setting along Highway #337 on the Gulf Shore of Antigonish County. The first Catholic chapel in Georgeville district was built at Morar about 1830. Remnants of that building were incorporated into the present-day vestry of St. George’s Church whose construction was completed in 1871. This vernacular style church features architectural elements including a symmetrical façade, a truncated central tower and Gothic windows. A cornerstone laid in 1860 contains a sealed bottle with coins and a document identifying members of the construction team including Peter MacKenzie, architect; John Smith, framer; and Thomas Brown, mason. Many of the early grantees to the area were of Highland Scottish extraction, including families with the surname McInnis, McLean, McNeil, McPherson and Gillis. Historically, fishing and farming have played an important part in local economy. The community invites you to enjoy a visit to our wharf at Livingstone’s Cove and explore our beaches!

Address
St. George's Roman Catholic Church
9415 Highway 337
Georgeville, NS B2G 2L4
Tickets
Lyghtesome Gallery
166 Main Street
Antigonish, NS B2G 2B7
(902) 863-8122
Venue Chair
Nancy Layden
(902) 863-3015
nancylayden@gmail.com

 

 

Halifax

Cathedral Church of All Saints

An architectural jewel, the cathedral is one of the finest examples of perpendicular gothic style in Canada. Soaring arches highlighted in deep reds and gold rise toward the vaulted ceiling nearly seven stories in height.  The sights and sounds of the busy city of Halifax, which has grown up around All Saints over the past 100 years, are hushed in the vast expanse bathed in soft colors of the striking stained-glass windows, and warmed by intricate oak carvings. These wood carvings of Robert “mousie” Thompson, in the sanctuary, the chancel, and the signature pulpit, took 30 years to complete and are the only example of Thompson’s work in Canada. Equally notable is the cathedral’s 5,000-pipe organ, the second largest in the Maritimes.

As the cathedral church for the Anglican Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, All Saints is the gathering place for liturgical events which draw and unite people from across two provinces for Synods, Ordinations and other celebrations, as well as the home for a very active and engaged parish community of some 300 families. On Sundays and throughout the week, their doors are open to provide a respite for those seeking spiritual refreshment, refuge, and inspiration.

Address
Cathedral Church of All Saints
1336 Martello Street
Halifax, NS
(902) 423-6002
www.cathedralchurchofallsaints.com

Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College

Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

Halifax

King’s College Chapel

Religious services have been a part of the life of the University of King’s College since it was founded in 1789 as the first college to be granted university status in British North America. King’s was modeled on the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge, which were residential, Anglican, and followed the tutorial approach to teaching. After a fire destroyed the original university buildings in Windsor, Nova Scotia, in 1920, the university relocated to Halifax and became associated with Dalhousie University. The Chapel was one of the original buildings to be built on the new five-acre Halifax campus by renowned American-Canadian architect, Andrew Cobb, one of the first students of the École des Beaux Arts in Paris to practice architecture in the Atlantic region. During World War II, King's was used as an officer training facility for the Royal Canadian Navy, and between 1941 and 1945 the Chapel ministered to young naval recruits. You will notice the Chapel's baptismal font is a ship's bell, given to the Chapel in honour and thanks for its war effort.

Home to a vibrant and multi-faith community of students, staff, faculty, and friends, the Chapel is both a place of quiet reflection and the hub of lively activity, all based upon its core belief in the promotion of community through worship. During term, the daily rhythm of prayer practiced in the Chapel forms the basic structure by which students can further approach the truth and beauty of their search for meaning in academic and personal terms. The chapel hosts lectures and discussions, organizes retreats and day trips, holds special suppers and potlucks, is involved in a range of outreach activities, and supports musical education of its student choristers and the community at large. It welcomes all who come through its doors.

Address
King’s College Chapel
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x140
www.kingschapel.ca
Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

 

 

Halifax

Lilian Piercey Concert Hall

The Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts offers an accessible and comprehensive program of dance and music instruction accommodating students of all ages and levels of ability. With its inception in 1887, the Conservatory is the largest, oldest, and most venerable of organizations for education in the performing arts east of Montreal. Its current home, built in 1910 as Halifax's Chebucto Road School, was designated a heritage building because of its role in the aftermath of the Halifax Explosion of 1917. With 39,000 square feet, 9 classrooms and 17 music and dance studios, the building ideally suits the needs of the Conservatory's current and future programs.

Included in the many fine rooms the building offers, is the beautiful Lilian Piercey Concert Hall, one of the finest acoustic halls in Halifax. The high arched ceiling and wall of windows create an elegant space in which to hear its two grand pianos and fine Dowd harpsichord or any other combination of acoustic instruments, orchestras, and ensembles. The gently-sloping carpeted floor leads to a floating hardwood front which doubles as a dance studio and performance stage.

Address
Lilian Piercey Concert Hall
Maritime Conservatory of the Performing Arts
6199 Chebucto Road
Halifax, NS B3L 1K7
(902) 423-6995
www.maritimeconservatory.com
Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

 

 

Halifax

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

The Maritime Museum of the Atlantic is the oldest and largest Maritime Museum in Canada. The original concept of the Museum can be credited to a group of Royal Canadian Navy officers who envisioned a maritime museum where relics of Canada’s naval past could be conserved. Starting with a small space at the Halifax Dockyard in 1948, the museum then moved to quarters in the Halifax Citadel in 1952, and became the Maritime Museum of Canada in 1957. Floods and fires in the early 1960s caused temporary relocations to a variety of sites until 1965, when a home was found in a former bakery building at the Navy’s Victualling Depot. The Museum became the Marine History section of the Nova Scotia Museum in 1967. The exhibits remained on Citadel Hill while the offices, library, and some of the collection moved to the new Nova Scotia Museum building on Summer Street in Halifax in 1970. Through the 1970s, a long search for a permanent home ensued. Finally, in 1982, the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic was established on the site of the Robertson & Son Ship Chandlery and A.M. Smith & Co. Properties on the Halifax Waterfront. It opened on January 22 of that year. Since then, more than 4 million people have visited the Museum. The Museum is a valuable historical, cultural and educational institution. It is the largest site in Nova Scotia that collects and interprets various elements of Nova Scotia’s marine history. Visitors are introduced to the age of steamships, local small craft, the Royal Canadian and Merchant Navies, World War II convoys and The Battle of the Atlantic, the Halifax Explosion of 1917, and Nova Scotia’s role in the aftermath of the Titanic disaster. The Small Craft Gallery is an impressive room with high ceilings to accommodate the masts of our nautical vessels collection and large windows looking out onto the harbour.

Address
Maritime Museum of the Atlantic
1675 Lower Water Street
Halifax, NS B3J 1S3
(902) 424-7490
www.maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca

Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

Halifax

St. George’s Anglican Church, ‘The Round Church’

The Parish of Saint George offers a unique combination of traditional Anglican worship and a commitment to Inner-City Ministry and has a fascinating history, expressed in tangible form by the two church buildings that lie within its boundaries, both bearing the name St. George, and both of national significance. The first St. George's, the "Little Dutch [Deutsch] Church," is the second oldest church in Halifax. Originally a small house, it was adapted for its purpose in 1756 and moved to the burying ground in the northern suburb of the German settlers’ community known as the "Foreign Protestants." To meet needs of a growing congregation, and with the support of the British government, the Parish embarked on the construction of a second St. George's in 1800. Its circular Palladian design, like that of Halifax's Town Clock, was a product of the architectural taste of Edward, Duke of Kent, commander of the forces in Nova Scotia and son of George III, who played an active role in the planning of the new building. Originally perfectly round, a porch and chancel were added between 1822-1827, creating a structure which, despite later alterations and additions, closely resembles what visitors see today.

Address
St. George’s Anglican Church, ‘The Round Church’
2222 Brunswick Street
Halifax, NS B3K 2Z2
(902) 423-1059
www.roundchurch.ca
Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

 

 

 

Iona

Malagawatch United Church, Highland Village Museum/An Clachan Gidhealach


The Highland Village Museum is a 43-acre living history museum and Gaelic folk-life centre that interprets, presents and celebrates Nova Scotia’s Gaelic Gaelic story and identity. Overlooking the world famous Bras d’Or Lake, costumed first person animators in 11 period buildings take visitors on a journey through 140 years of cultural evolution in Scotland and Nova Scotia, including emigration, immigration, pioneering and community building.

During the fall of 2003, the Malagawatch United Church was moved from its site near the shores of the River Denys Basin to the beautiful hills overlooking the Bras d’Or Lake at the Highland Village Museum in Iona. The spectacular journey involved travel over land and water, and was just another chapter in the church’s rich history. Long inhabited by First Nations people, Malagawatch takes its name from a Mi’kmaq word said to mean “lake of full islands”. The community of Malagawatch is one of the oldest Presbyterian communities in Cape Breton. The church building, built in 1874 as the Malagawatch Union Presbyterian Church, has a blending of architectural styles. It demonstrates Federal style in the squared-off windows; the tall spire, encouraging us to look towards the heavens, is Gothic; the front door has a taste of Greek Revival. The inside of the church is very plain in keeping with Presbyterian tradition. No musical instruments were used for singing until a pump organ was purchased in the 1940’s.

Address
Malagawitch United Church
Highland Village Museum/An Clachan Gidhealach
4119 Highway 223
Iona, NS B2C 1A3
(902) 725-2272
www.highlandvillage.ca
Tickets
Highland Village Museum Gift Shop
4119 Highway 223, Iona
(902) 725-2272
Venue Chair
Rodney Chaisson
chaissrs@gov.ns.ca

 

 

Lake Charlotte

Clam Harbour United Church, Memory Lane Heritage Village

Located on Nova Scotia’s beautiful Eastern Shore, the Clam Harbour United Church is now located at Memory Lane Heritage Village in Lake Charlotte (a 45 minute drive east from Dartmouth). The church provides an unforgettable venue for Musique Royale concerts. This simple church (seating is limited to 90) built in 1891 features superb acoustics in an intimate setting. However we do recommend that you bring a cushion for the “puritan pews”. The church was built by the Clam Harbour congregation, under the direction of Fred and Henry Stoddard who were trained carpenters. The framework of the building is constructed entirely of hand-hewn timbers and the basic integrity of the structure, more than a hundred years later, is a testament to the builders’ skills. This beautiful community church was restored to its late 1940s state by the Lake Charlotte Area Heritage Society. The restoration included building a replica of the original belfry (including a bell); restoring the stairs to the balcony and the balcony pews; painting the interior in its original colours; finding and installing a wood stove; shingling the outside with wooden shingles; and building and installing a replica of the diamond window originally located above the entrance door. Our concerts are followed by a four-course, lamp-lit dinner in the Village’s Cookhouse.

Address
Clam Harbour United Church
Memory Lane Heritage Village
28 Clam Harbour Road
Lake Charlotte, NS B0J 1Y0
(902) 845-1937
www.heritagevillage.ca
Tickets
Memory Lane Heritage Village Office (see above)

Venue Chair
Thea Wilson Hammond
info@heritagevillage.ca

 

 

Lunenburg

St. John’s Anglican Church

Old Town Lunenburg, founded in 1753, was officially designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in August, 1996. At the centre of the town is St. John’s Anglican Church, Canada’s second oldest Protestant church. It is undeniably one of the country’s most outstanding examples of Carpenter Gothic architecture. On November 1, 2001, a devastating fire struck St. John’s. The restoration project that followed is a testimonial to the power of faith which has motivated and inspired many people in the community and all over the world. St. John’s Anglican Church is the primary venue for Musique Royale with events taking place all year round. It is an active church with a strong musical outreach programme which hosts many cultural activities.

Address
St. John’s Anglican Church
81 Cumberland Street
Lunenburg, NS B0J 2C0
(902) 634-4994
www.stjohnslunenburg.org

Tickets
Shop on the Corner
263 Lincoln Street
Lunenburg, NS B0J 2C0
(please note that they accept cash only)
Venue Chair
Barbara Butler
(902) 624-0506
barbara.butler@ns.sympatico.ca

 

 

 

Mahone Bay

Cecilia ’s Retreat

Take Exit 10 (or 11 if you’d like a scenic detour) from Route 103 to find the scenic beauty and coastal charm of this unique area. Mahone Bay is known for its three waterfront churches, beautiful rails to trails walking paths, great cafes and bookstores, specialty crafts and art galleries, as well as sandy beaches and a lovely harbour. Cecilia’s Retreat is a private residence where music and hospitality are enjoyed while overlooking a spectacular view of Mader’s Cove. Come join us for a relaxed atmosphere of shared food and superb music. Bring your friends!

Address
Cecilia’s Retreat
1199 Oakland Road RR#2
Mahone Bay, NS B0J 2E0
(902) 624-0506

Tickets
Advance reservation only through barbara.butler@ns.sympatico.ca

 

 

Margaretsville

Evergreen Theatre

Margaretsville is a picturesque fishing village with magnificent sunsets and a panoramic view of the Bay of Fundy. It is the home of Fundy Folk, a society devoted to the performing arts that began as an extension of the kitchen parties that were common among the folk type musicians of the area. The Evergreen Theatre is a simple symmetrical wooden structure with gothic windows. The building is 175 years old, originally the Evergreen Baptist Church. In recent years it was donated to the community and converted into a performance space, now hosting over 20 performances per year. Its marvelous acoustics make it ideal as a venue for music.

Address
Evergreen Theatre
1941 Stronach Mountain Road
East Margaretsville, NS B0S 1N0
(902) 825-6834
www.evergreentheatre.ca
Tickets
Online purchase or telephone reservation (see above)
Venue Chair
David O’Leary
evergreentheatre@gmail.com

 

 

Merigomish

United Church

Merigomish is located on the south shore of Merigomish Harbour, Exit 27, off Highway 104. Its name is probably a variation of the Micmac name Malegomich, “the merrymaking place”. The area seems to have been one of the larger Indian camping grounds and Merigomish Harbour is believed to be a site significant for its archeological remnants. Settlement by Loyalist refugees from the American Revolutionary War began here in the area about 1784. Fishing and farming are the basic industries in the area, and the scenery along the Sunrise Trail is among the most beautiful in the province. In comparison to many of the churches in our region, Merigomish United Church is "relatively" new. It was built and completed in 1927 by many past relatives and friends who still attend today. However, there are some who probably still remember the dedication and efforts that went into the building of the structure. Merigomish United Church was dedicated with three separate services on Sunday, October 9, 1927. The minister was Rev. H.E. Campbell. The first service was at 11am and included guest speakers Rev. C.C. MacIntosh, Rev. Dr. A.H. Denson, Rev. J.D. MacLeod, and Rev. R.A. Patterson. There was another service at 3pm, and then another for the young people at 7pm. Our church maintains its devotion to the younger generations with a fabulous Sunday School.

Address
Merigomosh United Church
1587 Shore Road
Merigomish, NS B0K 1G0
(902) 926-2430

Tickets
Lyghtesome Gallery
166 Main Street
Antigonish, NS B2G 2B7
(902) 863-8122
Venue Chair
1. Vickie MacDonald
(902) 926-2556
pondsconservatory@gmail.com
2. Nancy Cheung
(902) 631-3627
hnchumley@gmail.com

 

 

 

Orangedale

United Church Manse

The Orangedale United Church was established in 1930, becoming an integral part of the community which it continues to do. The church became a member of the River and Lakeside Pastoral Charge in1954. Throughout its history, the church has brought music into the community, from Sunday School programs, putting on concerts with talented local musicians to hosting Celtic Colours Concerts.  The village of Orangedale is a small rural community nestled by the Bras D'or Lakes, in Cape Breton. It is home to the Orangedale Railway Museum which hosts a historic, Victorian style station built by the Intercolonial Railway Company, which gained some fame with the release of The Rankin Family's song "Orangedale Whistle". In recent years, L'Arche Cape Breton has become an important part of the community. Orangedale has and will remain a welcoming community to anyone who comes for a visit or to stay.

Address
United Church Manse
Orangedale Road
Orangedale, NS B0E 2K0
(902) 756-2829
Tickets
(902) 756-2994, (902) 756-2798, or (902) 756-2022
Venue Chair
Mary Ann McFadyen
(902) 756-2994
murandma@gmail.com

 

 

Parrsboro

Ottawa House Museum

Parrsboro is admired for its elegant houses and estates, many of which were built during the 1800’s, and the breathtaking scenic view it affords of the extraordinary tides of the Minas Basin. The Ottawa house was built circa 1765 and is the only remaining building of a busy ship building and international trading community. Overlooking the rocky cliffs of nearby Partridge Island, historic Ottawa House served as the summer home of Sir Charles Tupper, former Prime Minister of Canada and Father of Canadian Confederation. After serving as an inn for more than a century, this lovely Georgian structure was converted to a museum filled with period furnishings. Several rooms also house exhibits showcasing Parrsboro’s shipbuilding heritage.

Address
Ottawa House Museum
1155 Whitehall Road (P.O. Box 98)
Parrsboro, NS B0M 1S0
(902) 254-2376
www.ottawahousemuseum.ca
Tickets
From museum (see above)
Venue Chair
Susan Clarke
(902) 254-2376
ottawa.house@ns.sympatico.ca

 

Poplar Grove

St. John the Baptist Anglican Church

For over 200 years, this site has been a place of Christian worship. Situated beside the Old Ferry Road in Poplar Grove (near Avondale and Newport Landing on the Bay of Fundy), St. John the Baptist Anglican Church was originally built by the Methodists, possibly as early as 1794; the present building is most likely not the original structure. In 1863, the Baptists bought the building and used it until 1872. Except for occasional use by the Presbyterians, it remained closed until 1924 when it was bought by the Anglicans. Today, people of all faiths welcome the peace and quiet found in this unique church. During Sung Evensong, with candles all aglow and the beautiful oil lamps lit, we are reminded of simpler times.

Address
St. John the Baptist Anglican Church
908 Avondale Road
Poplar Grove, NS B0N 2A0
Tickets
Advance reservation through MR Box Office
(902) 634-9994 or stjartsalliance@eastlink.ca
Venue Chair
Hugh MacNeil
(902) 757-1869
ahmwp@ns.sympatico.ca

 

Port Williams

St. John ’s Anglican Church

The history of the Parish of Cornwallis dates back to 1761, a few short years after the deportment of the Acadians. Construction of St. John’s Anglican Church in Port Williams began in 1804 but because of lack of funds at the time the interior wasn’t completed until 1812. Over the years various additions and repairs have been made including an extension of the chancel and a change of seating in 1888 to create a third aisle of pews. The stained glass windows are outstanding with a number of memorials gracing its walls. The beauty of the sanctuary, the warmth of wood, and wonderful acoustic make this church a unique setting for Musique Royale performances.

Address
St. John’s Anglican Church
1105 Church Street
Port Williams, NS
(902) 542-7476
www.parishofcornwallis.ca
Tickets
Advance reservation through MR Box Office
(902) 634-9994 or stjartsalliance@eastlink.ca
Venue Chair
Diana Shelley
(902) 542-5300
dianashelley@hotmail.com

 

 

Shelburne

The Osprey Arts Centre

The Osprey Arts Centre vision sees a community where all members, youth, adult and senior, and culturally diverse, have access to high quality performing arts events, both amateur and professional, to be a place where people turn for training in the arts and to be available to all members of the community as a place to perform. Open year round, the Osprey exhibits visual art and presents popular and classical music, live theatre, summer arts camps for kids, a literary festival, and book launches. It hosts events across Shelburne County in schools and other venues and rents its space to community groups and for public and private functions such as weddings, meetings, conferences, and lectures. The Centre is run by a volunteer Board of Directors and three part-time staff.

Address
The Osprey Arts Centre
107 Water Street
Shelburne, NS B0T 1W0
(902) 875-2359
www.ospreyartscentre.com
Tickets
TLC Pharmacy
157 Water Street
Shelburne, NS
(902) 875-4852
OR Ticketpro (888) 311-9090 (toll free)
Venue Chair
Alex Buchanan
ospreyartscentre@eastlink.ca

 

 

Tatamagouche

Sharon United Church

Tatamagouche is situated where the rivers French and Waugh enter a natural harbour, and it gets its name from the Mi’kmaq ‘Takumegooch’ meaning ‘meeting of the waters’. In 1755 the British expelled the Acadians and the village was destroyed. All that remains from that period are some Acadian dykes and French place names. Protestant re-population began in 1765 followed by a sizeable shipbuilding industry. Recently restored, the former Tatamagouche Creamery buildings comprise a complex that houses the popular year-round Farmers Market and Creamery Museum. Future plans for the Creamery complex include construction of a performing arts centre. The concert venue in Tatamagouche is the historic Sharon United Church with its fine acoustics. Built in 1854 to serve local Presbyterians, it became Sharon United Church in 1925 following church union. The building was enlarged in 1871, an organ was added in 1888, and in 1930 the old closed-in pews were replaced by the present ones.

Address
Sharon United Church
15 Church Street
Tatamagouche, NS B0K 1V0
(902) 657-2699
Tickets
Fulton’s Pharmacy
Tatamagouche, NS B0K 1V0
(902) 657-2545
Venue Chair
Ann Manicom
(902) 257-2519
annmanicom@gmail.com

 

 

Truro

St. John’s Anglican Church

The heritage value of St. John’s Anglican Church is both historical and spiritual in nature, being the principal place of worship for a congregation whose roots extend back to the earliest days of the Truro township. Construction of the first St. John’s, a wood-frame structure on the site of the present building, began in 1821 and was completed in 1825. The current building, constructed of freestone, is a very good example of the 19th century revival of the English Gothic style in ecclesiastical architecture. The steeply pitched roof, flying buttresses, pointed arches and tracery are identifying elements. The crenelated tower was a later addition. The actual work on the church was started in 1873 with plans drawn up by architect William Thomas of Montreal, and was finally completed in 1881.

Address
St. John’s Anglican Church
23 Church Street
Truro, NS B2N 3Z5
(902) 893-2532
www.stjohnstruro.ca
Tickets
Advance reservation through MR Box Office
(902) 634-9994 or stjartsalliance@eastlink.ca
Venue Chair
Bill Canning
(902) 895-5902
wcanning@eastlink.ca

 

 

Wolfville

Manning Memorial Chapel

Wolfville is a town of elegance and charm set amid natural wonders. Stately elms, manicured lawns, and the rich architecture of its century old homes give Wolfville an historic grace and unprecedented charm. Home of Acadia University, one of Canada’s finest undergraduate schools, Wolfville is considered the academic and cultural centre of the Annapolis Valley. The university had no chapel until 1960, when major funds were provided by the Fred C. Manning Charitable Fund. The Manning Memorial Chapel, an American Colonial brick structure, was opened in October of 1963. Of particular note is the classical Baroque organ in the balcony and the spectacular front stained-glass windows with their images outlined in gold leaf.

Address
Manning Memorial Chapel
Acadia University
45 Acadia Street
Wolfville, NS B4P 2R6
www.acadiau.ca/chaplain/chapel.htm
Tickets
Advance reservation through MR Box Office
(902) 634-9994 or stjartsalliance@eastlink.ca
Venue Chair
Nancy Burbidge
(902) 582-3933
burbidsn@xcountry.tv

 

 

 

Yarmouth

Holy Trinity Anglican Church


Holy Trinity Anglican Church is valued for its role in the Anglican community of Yarmouth, for its historical associations with Rev. Ranna Cossitt, the parish’s first rector, and with Rev. Roy Campbell, designer of the church. It is also valued for its Gothic Revival architecture and stained glass windows.

The first Anglican church in Yarmouth was built around 1793 on Main Street (almost directly west of the site of the present Anglican church). The building served other purposes as well, including as a hospital when an epidemic struck the town. In 1799 it was sold and moved, though a panelled door from the church was removed and is preserved in the present parish hall. For the next several years services were held in the loft of a shed on Baker’s Wharf, the present site of the ferry terminal, where it is said the first communion service was held in 1806. The architect for this building was Rev. J. R. Roy Campbell, who had trained as an architect as well as a priest in England, and was the Curate of Holy Trinity Church. A brochure printed about the church says of him “He was an enthusiast for the neo-gothic movement that parallelled the Oxford Movement in its enthusiasm for the medieval Catholic heritage of Anglicanism.” Rev. Campbell was also the author of an extensive and authoritative history of Yarmouth County, which is still considered among the most reliably factual local histories.

The first sod for this present Gothic Revival style structure was turned in 1866, the ground excavated in 1867, cornerstone laid on August 20, 1868, the walls built in 1869, and the tower and spire completed in 1870. The building was consecrated on August 4, 1872 with a congregation of more than 800 present. The church is constructed of brick with New Brunswick freestone trim in the cruciform plan, and heavily buttressed. The many beautiful stained-glass windows are also noteworthy, most of them having been funded by individuals or family groups of the parish in memory of deceased family members.

Address
Holy Trinity Anglican Church
63 William Street
Yarmouth, NS B5A 3A6
(902) 742-3181
Tickets
(902) 742-8765
Venue Chair
Joan Semple
(902) 742-8765
joan.semple@hotmail.com